Want to Detox and Declutter Your Home? Try this Eco-Friendly Trend in Your Bathroom

With most of the products in our homes, we don’t spend much time thinking about what’s in them, but that’s beginning to change. It’s never been easier to learn about what our current bathroom products are doing to the environment, ourselves and our families. One of the best ways you can avoid toxic chemicals and cut down on the number of products you have is to shop for all natural zero waste products.

If you want to avoid clutter and chemicals, switch up your shower routine. The main chemical you want to avoid in soaps, face washes and shaving gels is triclosan an

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Travel size 4-in-1 bars lather up perfectly

antibacterial ingredient originally meant for hospitals, but now it’s in most of the products in your home. According to Slow Death by Rubber Duck, triclosan builds up in human (and animal) bodies and on top of that has made its way into our waterways. Although there haven’t been enough studies on its effects on our bodies, it is helping create antibacterial resistant bacteria from overuse. Even though we may not know precisely what triclosan does to our (and our pets) bodies, we do know we don’t need to to make perfectly good soap. Try and find triclosan-free bathroom products from a local business. It’s easier to ask questions and find out what’s really in a product when you can talk to the person making them face to face. Try visiting small businesses, farmers markets or online business to find the perfect product for you.

To avoid clutter and toxins try a four-in-one bar. Growing Green has four-in-one bars in unscented, lavender and orange. These bars replace your shampoo, conditioner, soap and shaving cream in one plastic free bar. All of Growing Green’s products are triclosan, paraben, and sulphate free. By minimizing to one product, you are saving money, creating less waste, and makes your morning routine easier. The main ingredient of these bars is organic fair trade coconut oil, and they are gentle enough for your face and perfect for children* since these bars eliminate four products at once, they are the perfect first step to a more eco-friendly bathroom.

 

 

*, Of course, all soaps should be tested on a small portion of the skin (such as your wrist) before use

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Shampoo Bars Not for You…

…It Might Be Your Water

I’ve never had a problem using my 4-in-1 bars for my hair. I always feel clean afterwards and love the way it works. All I need is an apple cider vinegar rinse once a week to keep my hair nice and soft. Once I moved into my bosses house to housesit, I started having problems.
My shampoo bar was not working for me anymore. I would wash my hair like usual, but my hair would still be greasy (if not greaser!). I tried using a vinegar rinse more often, and it did nothing! My hair was looking horrible, and I couldn’t figure out why. I tried washing my hair less often or more often, and nothing worked. I started using normal

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My travel size 4-in-1 bar lathers up nicely

shampoo again (Live Clean Organic) which worked. Eventually, I finished house-sitting. Once I came home, my hair went back to normal, and I could use my shampoo bars again.

My house and the house I was sitting for are both on wells. I’m not sure what the problem was, but it seems to be the water. I think the other house didn’t have a water softener, but that’s all I can think of as the problem. I’m moving soon, so fingers crossed my new water and shampoo bar get along, or I’m going to be sad. If my shampoo bar doesn’t work at my new house, I am going to mess around with my shampoo bar recipe and give myself lots of options to test out.
Have any of you had problems with shampoo bars?
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Low waste Lazy Soap

I got a ton of soap molds for Christmas and my birthday last year and haven’t used them! IMG_5593So I decided to give it a go. I wanted my first soap making experience to be so easy a child could do it so I used a soap base. I found a natural honey soap base at my local farming supplies store by chance and bought it. For only a couple dollars of soap base, some dyes and essential oils I made fifteen soaps so I was happy. The soap base was wrapped in plastic but it is still less packaging than fifteen soaps individually wrapped would have had.

I originally made uncoloured soaps but I found that boring and melted them again to add colouring. To add some texture I added some dried lavender from my garden to some, and coffee to an other. I think dried citrus zest would work great too.

All you have to do is melt the soap base. I did so using a double boiler (a metal bowl over a pot of boiling water). I have a specific metal bowl I use for all DIY things so that I don’t have to worry about it being soapy or beeswaz covered and then using it for food.

Once you melt the base pour it into your molds and add whatever you want to it. If you don’t have a mold you can use a silicon icecube tray or make a mold using a box/baking dish and line it completely with parchment paper ( I havn’t tried that yet so if it doesn’t work I’m sorry) and then cut them into squares after.

Have you tried melt and pour soap?